The inner speech tool to manage learning

Managing inner speech is a tool to manage visual and auditory learning material inputs

Visual inputs

Auditory inputs

We all experienced it

Have you met a person, she introduces herself, you clearly hear her name, but after 20 seconds you cannot recall her name?

You fall short generating a the correct words for a visual image.

Have a person gave you verbal directions to a destination in a logical

detailed way, you grasp it; but after 20 seconds you are not able to

follow the directions?

You fall short in translating words into road map images.

What normally happens in the brain

When seeing a dog, the brain uses inner speech words to describe the dog, e.g. ’beautiful eyes’ or ‘aggressive’

Inner speech words the brain may employ when seeing a chair can be ‘comfortable’ and ‘wood’.


The point of departure is a picture (external stimulus). The

destination is a description consisting of words (internal in the mind).

Picture → Words

When hearing text, the brain uses inner speech to translate the words

into pictures. For example, if the brain hears ‘chair’ the brain sees a

chair.

The brain does not see the word chair.


The same applies if the brain hears the word green. Inner speech brings

all the attributes of the colour green into the internal discussion

that will probably address shades of green and texture.

The point of departure is a set of text or words (external stimulus). The destination is a picture (internal in in the mind).

Words → Picture

Mental blocks that prevent inner speech

Normal mental dipping

Other interests

Time pressure

Anxiety

Stress

Dyslexia

In short, the brain translates words into pictures and translates pictures into words.

When put under stress the brain becomes auditory blind and visually deaf.

Summary

See the stimuli but cannot hear it internally: Visually deaf.

Hear the stimuli but cannot see it internally: Auditory blind.

Classroom example

When learners are provided with visual inputs, for example demonstrating how to solve a math problem, the learner is not able to create their own text from visual inputs.

When a learner is provided with verbal inputs, for example a teacher using words to explain how the heart pumps blood through the body, the learner is not able to establish and ‘see’ the pictures.

Impact on learning

After the lesson, when learners start to pursue their brain for pictures, they fall short, resulting in teachers wanting to climb walls

out of frustration. How can this be possible as they just showed it to the learners?

After the lesson, when learners start to pursue their brain for words and related terminology, they fall short, resulting in teachers wanting

to climb walls out of frustration. How can this be possible as they just explained it to the learners.

Chaos

When the teacher assumes and expects that all learners can translate words into pictures all the time.

When the teacher assumes and expects that all learners can create mind images based on verbal explanations all the time.

Want more chaos?

Show learners pictures of objects and processes and prevent them to formulate their own mental notes.

Read from a textbook and prevent learners to establish their own mental images

Examples when learners were enabled to engage in inner speech

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